Is this German wine dry?

Some hints on determining whether a German wine has significant residual sugar, or not.

  • What is the abv%?  If it is 13%+ then it will be dry, if 7-10% then there will be noticeable sweetness, the lower the abv the sweeter the wine; between 10% and 13% is the mid-ground, respectively of medium sweet -> medium dry -> off-dry.
  • Label shows trocken, possibly in combination with a pradikat, spatlese trocken for example – the wine is dry, but the body will range from light to medium depending on ripeness of the grapes.
  • Label shows halbtrocken or feinherb – the wine is off-dry to medium dry.
  • Label says classic or selection – the wine is dry.
  • Label states ‘dry’, maker is Dr Loosen, and vintage is 2008 or later, then the wine is technically dry.
  • Label has the Charta logo – the wine is riesling and is dry to off-dry
  • Label has the VDP logo and shows trocken and/or GG or equivalent Grosses Gewachs – then the wine is dry.
  • Label shows landwein – the wine is dry to medium-dry.
  • Label does not show VDP, but gives terms such as kabinett, spatlase or auslese – then without further qualifying back label information or intimate knowledge of the producer’s style, then it is uncertain as to where the wine lies in the range dry to sweet.
  • Label does show VDP, with terms such as kabinett, spatlase, auslese and so on – these are wines with increasingly noticeable residual sugar, and so are progressively sweeter as one heads through kabinett to auslese to trockenbeereenauslese.

About citbp

I am interested in everything about wine, from site selection to tasting.
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