Free aroma kit

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The aim here, as with Nez du Vin, is nose training, but not to identify discrete aromas, rather to discern firstly between aroma families, eg florality from amongst citrus, orchard or red fruit notes. And then sniffing within each family eg floral with a savoury edge, such as hawthorn and elderflower, or with a medicinal edge such as peony, and pure floral, such as lilac, linden or viola, and then into herbs and spices.

Experiencing different aromas as often as they present is a great way to improve one’s nose. Naturally occurring sources are everywhere, in the home, garden, hedgerows, verges, parks, garden centres and the countryside – a great way to practice aroma recognition – at no cost. In England some are found outside all year, make a seasonal appearance, or are just in the home or retail environment. I have split aromas, and some flavours, into these 3 groupings. Images are included with most entries, sometimes augmented with a link to the Royal Horticultural Society plant page, as [rhs].

|Outside all year|Jan|Feb|Mar|Apr|May|Jun|Jul|Aug|Sept|Oct|Nov|Dec|In the home|

– Outside all year –
bay tree leaf  [image] [rhs]
blackcurrant  [image]  depending on the time of year, the aroma can be found in cut wood, buds and leaves.
caramel  if you live near Newark (Notts), Cantley or Wissington (Norfolk) or Bury St Edmunds (Suffolk), sites of the country’s sugar beet processing plants, you will be familiar with the aroma of caramelising sugar when the plants are operating.
citrus blossom  [image]  citrus trees have flowers and fruit in various stages of development in a continuous cycle.
citrus fruit  bergamot, lemon, lime and orange – if you have a house plant, otherwise, if you try to avoid supermarkets like me, it’s a visit to the greengrocer or garden centre.
coconut  from gorse (with spikes) and broom (no spikes) – there are varying levels of flowering throughout the year, best in late winter and early spring – they both have a fresh coconut note. In a warm summer, the coconut can be edged with tropical mango.
curry plant leaf  [rhs]  there must be a subliminal curry note on Chateau Musar, as it goes well with curry, in my opinion.
eucalyptus leaf  [image]  similar nose to camphor.
geranium leaf   [image]  the aroma/flavour compound is geraniol, the emergence of this note in a muscat-based wine signifies a wine that is past its best.
gorse flower  [image] [rhs]  see coconut, the range of gorse varieties means that there is always gorse in bloom.
juniper leaf and fruit  [image] [rhs]  pull up the branches of any low growing plant with short pine like needles, it may be a member of the Juniper family and have small berries from green to black.  There are upright versions too in the UK, grown in the wild and used for gin botanicals.
lavender leaf  [image] can be found in some herbes de provence blends.
pansy  [image]  a member of the viola family
pine  [image]  I have tried a few trees, and recommend the short needled Cedar of Lebanon; better still, in spring pick a branch growing tip of more or less any pine – the aroma lasts for ages.
rosemary leaf  [image]
sage leaf  [image]
spearmint leaf  [rhs]  more menthol than plain garden and apple mints, in a sheltered spot they never quite die down completely.
thyme leaf  [image]

– January –
mahonia  [image] [rhs]  Mahonia x media Lionel Fortescue, with a scent reminiscent of lily of the valley.
primrose  [image]
wallflower 
 [image]  all colours, reminiscent of rich tea rose.

– February –
dandelion flower  [image]  smells like fresh cut straw, with a stable-like edge, perhaps
mahonia  [image] [rhs]  Mahonia x media Lionel Fortescue, with a scent reminiscent of lily of the valley.
wallflower  [image] [rhs]  all colours, reminiscent of rich tea rose.

– March –
bergenia  [image] [rhs] aka elephant’s ears, with a (more) intense heather-like scent.
bluebell  [image]
choisya  [image]  a deep floral aroma of acacia mixed with hawthorn, with a peppery edge.
clematis flammula  [image]  a firm-leafed evergreen vine with a strong scent of jasmine, within an hour of picking an undertone of naptha (as used in old style moth balls) develops.
dandelion flower   [image smells like fresh cut straw, with stable like edge.
flowering currant  [image] [rhs] a pungent aroma if the leaves are rubbed, the blossom has a red fruited scent underpinned with strong aromas of dried sweat, sage and nettle.
lemon balm leaf  [image]
mahonia
   [image] [rhs]  Mahonia x media Lionel Fortescue, with a scent reminiscent of lily of the valley.
mint leaf  [image]  two varieties shown.
jasmine [image]  hardy winter flowering.
primrose  [image]
rhubarb  [image]  when stewed.
stinging nettle  [image]  use gloves and chop up the young nettles.
stocks  [image]  a deep floral scent puntuated by clove.
viola  [image]  all colours.
violets  [image]  note that the dog violet has no scent.
wallflower  [image] [rhs] all colours, reminiscent of rich tea rose.
walnut leaf
  [image] crush the leaves for savoury and cut unripe pineapple aromas.

– April –
apple blossom  [image]
bergenia 
[image] [rhsaka elephant’s ears, with a (more) intense heather-like scent.
blackcurrant leaf  [image]
bluebell  [image]
cherry blossom  [image]  fruiting cherry.
choisya  [image]  a deep floral aroma of acacia mixed with hawthorn, with a peppery edge.
clematis flammula  [image]  a firm-leafed evergreen vine with a strong scent of jasmine, within an hour of picking an undertone of naptha (as used in old style moth balls) develops.
cut grass
daffodil   [image]  found this on a Muscadet sur Lie.
dandelion flower  [image]  smells like fresh cut straw, with a stable-like edge.
easter lily  [image]  Lilium langiforum
elderflower blossom  [image]  new blossom shows a very faint aroma of sweat, lightly toasted, creamy slightly floral with a bitter herbaceous edge, becoming increasingly sweaty as the blossom ages – this is the same if a blossom is picked and left to dry overnight, then after a few days latex emerges. 28th April 2014 is the earliest I have seen it in flower [Nottingham].
fennel frond  [image]
fern leaf  [image]  crushed, appears in some South African sauvignon blanc.
flowering currant  [image] [rhs] a pungent aroma if the leaves are rubbed, the blossom has a red fruited scent underpinned with strong aromas of dried sweat, sage and nettle.
grape hyacinth  [image]  blue only.
hawthorn blossom  [image]  white only, the red cultivar has no aroma,  a floral, creamy aroma, with a savouriness, and an edge of latex as the blossom ages.
horse-chestnut blossom  [image]  white only, the red/pink cultivar has no aroma, a delicate jasmine-like aroma.
hyacinth  [image]  blue, pink, red and white.
lemon balm leaf  [rhs]
lemon verbena leaf  [rhs]
lilac blossom  [purple, white], also pink.
mint leaf  [image]  two varieties shown.
narcissus  [image]  multiple blooms from a single head.
oregano  [image]
pea shoot  [image]  can be found in some sauvignon blanc.
pear blossom  [image]  floral but not attractive, more herbaceous.
pine nuts  [rhs tree]  from the Italian Stone Pine (Pinus pinea), in UK since the 1600s.
primrose  [image]
rhubarb  [image]  when stewed.
rowan  [image] [rhs]  the white blossom has a scent quite close to that of hawthorn.
stinging nettle  [image]  use gloves and chop up the young nettles.
stocks  [image]  a deep floral scent punctuated by clove.
viola  [image]  all colours.
violets  [image]  note that the dog violet has no scent.
wallflower  [image[rhs]  all colours, reminiscent of rich tea rose.
walnut leaf  
[image]  crush the leaves for savoury and cut unripe pineapple aromas.

– May –
apple blossom  [image]
azalea  [image]  all colours, many, but not all, are fragrant.
asparagus  [image]  the stem, cut or cooked.
bergenia  [image] [rhs] aka elephant’s ears, with a (more) intense heather-like scent.
blackcurrant leaf  [image]
bluebell  [image]
broom flower   [image]  a delicate floral-coconut scent.
buttercup  [image]  I have seen this noted as an aroma in Prosecco, all I get is the slightest savoury note, maybe it’s below my sensory threshold. BEWARE all parts of this plants are poisonous and the sap an irritant.
cherry blossom  [image]  fruiting cherry.
choisya  [image] a deep floral aroma of acacia mixed with hawthorn, with a peppery edge.
clematis  [image]  all colours and combinations, some have a vanilla or confected scent.
crab apple blossom  [image]
cut grass
daffodil  [image]  found this on a Muscadet sur Lie.
dandelion flower  [image]  smells like fresh cut straw, with a stable-like edge.
easter lily  [image]  Lilium langiforum
elderflower blossom  [image]  new blossom shows a very faint aroma of sweat, lightly toasted, creamy slightly floral with a bitter herbaceous edge, becoming increasingly sweaty as the blossom ages – this is the same if a blossom is picked and left to dry overnight, then after a few days latex emerges. 28th April 2014 is the earliest I have seen it in flower [Nottingham].
false acacia [image]
fennel frond  [image]
fern leaf  [image]  crushed, appears in some South African sauvignon blanc.
field bindweed [image]  a delicate generic soft floral scent.
grape hyacinth  [image]  blue only.
hawthorn blossom  [image]  white only, the red cultivar has no aroma, a floral, creamy aroma, with a savouriness, and an edge of latex as the blossom ages.
horse-chestnut blossom  [image]  white only, the red/pink cultivar has no aroma, a delicate jasmine-like aroma.
hyacinth  [image]  blue, pink, red and white.
lemon balm leaf  [image]
lemon verbena leaf  [image]
laburnum blossom  [image]
lilac blossom  [purplewhite], also pink.
lupin  
[image]
mint leaf  [image]  two varieties shown.
mock orange blossom  [rhs] [image]  philadelphus coronarius, white flower with 4 petals and yellow stamens, with a delicate aroma of citrus blossom, some strains have a curious undertone of naphthalene, the aromatic insecticidal constituent of old style moth balls.
narcissus  [image]  multiple blooms from a single head.
oregano  [image]
pea shoot  [image]  can be found in some sauvignon blanc.
pear blossom  [image]  floral but not attractive, more herbaceous.
pinks  [image] [image] [rhs]  of the Dianthus family, along with carnations and sweet williams;  the scent of pinks is dominated by cloves.
peony  [image]   some have a rose and spicy or vegetal aroma, others more garrigue-like with a medicinal almost tarry note, not unlike Hibiscrub (a readily available non-prescription antiseptic) – unexpected in a pink flower.
potato flower
 [image]  delicately sweet and floral, with a savoury edge.
primrose  [image]
privet blossom  [image]
rape seed flower  [image]
rowan  [image] [rhs]  the white blossom has a scent quite close to that of hawthorn.
rhubarb
  [image]  when stewed.
stinging nettle  [image]  use gloves and chop up the young nettles.
stocks  [image]  a deep floral scent puntuated by clove.
tomato leaf  [image]  can be found in sauvignon blanc and merlot.
viola  [image]  all colours.
violets  [image]  note that the dog violet has no scent.
wallflower  [image] [rhs]  all colours, reminiscent of rich tea rose.
walnut leaf  [image]  crush the leaves for savoury and cut unripe pineapple aromas.
wild fennel frond   [image]  aromas of anise and liquorice; the stems and fronds are edible, but not the root – there is no bulb, this is a feature of domestic varieties.
wild rose  [image]
wisteria blossom  [image]

– June –
apple blossom  [image]
asparagus  [image the stem, cut or cooked; some shoots have now grown tall, woody and started to develop fronds.
azalea  [image]  all colours, many, but not all, are fragrant.
blackberry blossom  [image]  delicate, sweet and floral.
blackcurrant and leaf  [image]
bluebell  [image]
broom flower   [image]  a delicate floral-coconut scent.
buttercup   [image]  I have seen this noted as an aroma in Prosecco, all I get is the slightest savoury note, maybe it’s below my sensory threshold. BEWARE all parts of this plants are poisonous and the sap an irritant.
clematis  [image]  all colours and combinations, some have a vanilla or confected scent.
clover flower  [image]  white and purple clover have a delicately perfumed floral, even wild rose-like aroma, and sweet grass notes.
cut grass
dandelion flower  [image]  smells like fresh cut straw, with a stable-like edge.
easter lily  [image]  Lilium Langiforum
elderflower blossom   [image]  new blossom shows a very faint aroma of sweat, lightly toasted, creamy slightly floral with a bitter herbaceous edge, becoming increasingly sweaty as the blossom ages – this is the same if a blossom is picked and left to dry overnight, then after a few days latex emerges. 28th April 2014 is the earliest I have seen it in flower [Nottingham].
false acacia  [image]
fennel frond  [image]
fern leaf [image] crushed, appears in some South African sauvignon blanc.
field bindweed [image]  a delicate generic soft floral scent.
grape vine blossom  [image] [alternative]  has a delicate scent.
hawthorn blossom  white only, the red cultivar has no aroma, a floral, creamy aroma, with a savouriness, and an edge of latex as the blossom ages.
honeysuckle   [image] [rhs]  wild hedgerow honeysuckle has an additional savoury note.
iris flower  [image]  a sweet almost confected aroma.
laburnum blossom  [image]
lavender flower  [image]
lemon balm leaf  [image]
lemon verbena leaf  [image]
lily of the valley  [image]
lilac blossom   [purple, white]  also pink.
lime tree blossom  [image]  known as Linden on the Continent, with that aroma.
lupin  [image]
mint leaf  [image]  two varieties shown.
mock orange blossom  [rhs] [image]  philadelphus coronarius, white flower with 4 petals and yellow stamens, with a delicate aroma of citrus blossom, some strains have a curious undertone of naphthalene, the aromatic insecticidal constituent of old style moth balls.
monkey musk  [image] [alternative]  a waterside perennial with a musky aroma, along with saffron and a slightly chemical edge.
mulberry  [image]  immature berry.
oregano  [image]
pea shoot [image]  can be found in some sauvignon blanc.
pear blossom  [image]  floral but not attractive, more herbaceous.
peony  [image]  some have a rose and spicy or vegetal aroma, others more garrigue-like with a medicinal almost tarry note, not unlike Hibiscrub (a readily available non-prescription antiseptic) – unexpected in a pink flower.
petunia   [image]  all colours and combinations.
pinks  [image] [image] [rhs]  of the Dianthus family, along with carnations and sweet williams;  the scent of pinks is dominated by cloves.
potato flower  [image]  delicately sweet and floral, with a savoury edge.
privet blossom  [image]
pyracantha blossom  [image]  a particularly spike shrub
rape seed flower  [image]
redcurrant  [image]  crushed leaves have no aroma, unlike blackcurrant leaf.
red valerian [image] [rhs]  if you ever smell gas or sewage around gardens, look around for this stinker, included here as an aroma attending some Chateauneuf-du-Pape.
rhubarb  [image]  when stewed.
rose  [image]  all colours.
scabious  (image)  wild and cultivated, with a sweet delicate scent.
spotted dead nettle  [image] [rhs]  flowers scent is reminiscent of tea, and the leaves smell of tea/garrigue/herbes de provence, a little spicy.
stinging nettle  [image]  use gloves and chop up the young nettles.
stocks  [image]  a deep floral scent punctuated by clove.
sweet william  [image] [rhs]
tomato leaf  [image]  can be found in sauvignon blanc and merlot.
viola  [image]  all colours.
wallflower  [image] [rhs]  all colours, reminiscent of rich tea rose.
walnut leaf   [image]  crush the leaves for savoury and cut unripe pineapple aromas.
white acacia blossom  [image]
wild fennel frond  [image]
wild rose  [image]
wild strawberry  [image]  fruit size 5-8mm diameter.
wisteria blossom  [image]

– July –
asparagus frond  [image]
azalea  [image]  all colours, many, but not all, are fragrant.
blackcurrant and leaf  [image]
blueberry  an aroma and taste profile synonymous with blackberry.
buddleia blossom  [image] aka butterfly bush, an interesting floral/herbal aroma.
buttercup  [image]  BEWARE all parts of this plants are poisonous and the sap an irritant.
clematis  [image]  all colours and combinations, some have a vanilla or confected scent.
clover flower  [image]  white and purple clover have a delicately perfumed floral, even wild rose-like aroma, and sweet grass notes.
cut grass
dandelion flower   [image]  smells like fresh cut straw, with a stable-like edge.
fennel frond  [image]
fern leaf  [image]  crushed, appears in some South African sauvignon blanc.
field bindweed [image]  a delicate generic soft floral scent.
grape vine blossom
  [image] [alternative]  has a delicate scent.
green pepper/bell pepper   greenhouse grown.
hay
honeysuckle  [image] [rhs]
iris flower  [image]  a sweet almost confected aroma.
jasmine   [image]  hardy, summer flowering.
lavender flower  [image]
lemon balm leaf  [image]
lemon verbena leaf  [image]
magnolia grandiflora  [image]
mint leaf  [image]  two varieties shown.
monkey musk  [image] [alternative]  a waterside perennial with a musky aroma, along with saffron and a slightly chemical edge.
mulberry
 [image]  immature berry.
oregano  [image]
pea shoot  [image]  can be found in some sauvignon blanc.
peony  [image]  some have a rose and spicy or vegetal aroma, others more garrigue-like with a medicinal almost tarry note, not unlike Hibiscrub (a readily available non-prescription antiseptic) – unexpected in a pink flower.
petunia  [image]  all colours and combinations.
pinks  [image] [image] [rhs]  of the Dianthus family, along with carnations and sweet williams;  the scent of pinks is dominated by cloves.
privet blossom  [image]
redcurrant  [image]  crushed leaves have no aroma, unlike blackcurrant leaf.
red valerian  [image] [rhs]  if you ever smell gas or sewage around gardens, look around for this stinker, included here as an aroma attending some Chateauneuf-du-Pape.
rose  [image]  all colours.
scabious  (image)  wild and cultivated, with a sweet delicate scent.
spotted dead nettle  [image] [rhs]  flowers scent is reminiscent of tea, and the leaves smell of tea/garrigue/herbes de provence, a little spicy.
stinging nettle  [image]  use gloves and chop up the young nettles.
stocks  [image]  a deep floral scent punctuated by clove.
strawberry
sweet pea flower  [image]  all colours.
sweet william  [image] [rhs]
tomato leaf  [image]  can be found in sauvignon blanc and merlot.
viola  [image]  all colours.
wallflower  [image] [rhs]  all colours, reminiscent of rich tea rose.
walnut leaf   [image]  crush the leaves for savoury and cut unripe pineapple aromas.
wild cherry  [image]
wild fennel frond  [image]
wild rose  [image]
wild strawberry  [image]  fruit size 5-8mm diameter.

– August –
apple
apricot
asparagus frond  [image]
blackberry  [rhs]
blackcurrant and leaf  [image]
blueberry   an aroma and taste profile synonymous with blackberry
buddleia blossom  [image]  aka butterfly bush, an interesting floral/herbal aroma.
cherry
clematis  [image]  all colours and combinations, some have a vanilla or confected scent.
clover flower  [image]  white and purple clover have a delicately perfumed floral, even wild rose-like aroma, and sweet grass notes.
cut grass
dandelion flower   [image]  smells like fresh cut straw, with a stable-like edge.
elderberry  [rhs]  similar aroma (and taste), when completely ripe, to mulberry, with similar tart acidity. When not quite ripe there is an earthy/herbaceous edge.
fennel frond  [image]
fern leaf  [image]  crushed, appears in some South African sauvignon blanc.
fig  [image]
gooseberry [image]
greengage
green pepper/bell pepper   greenhouse grown.
hay
honeysuckle  [image] [rhs]
lavender flower  [image]
lemon balm leaf  [image]
lemon verbena leaf  [image]
magnolia grandiflora  [image]
mint leaf  [image]  two varieties shown.
monkey musk  [image] [alternative] a waterside perennial with a musky aroma, along with saffron and a slightly chemical edge.
mulberry  [rhs ripens unevenly, starting in August, white, red and black. Not a common tree, www.locations.sprouting.org will help find one, to try tasting this loganberry shaped fruit.  When ripe it has a sweet-sour taste, combining loganberry and blackberry.  Dried fruits are in some heath food shops, with a vaguely nutty/toffee aroma, somewhat like goji berries in taste.
oregano  [image]
pea shoot  [image]  can be found in some sauvignon blanc.
pear
petunia  [image]  all colours and combinations.
plum
raspberry
red valerian  [image] [rhs]  if you ever smell gas or sewage around gardens, look around for this stinker, included here as an aroma attending some Chateauneuf-du-Pape.
rose  [image]  all colours.
scabious  (image)  wild and cultivated, with a sweet delicate scent.
stinging nettle  [image]  use gloves and chop up the young nettles.
stocks  [image]  a deep floral scent punctuated by clove.
strawberry
sweet pea flower
tomato leaf  [image]  can be found in sauvignon blanc and merlot.
viola  [image]  all colours.
walnut leaf   [image]  crush the leaves for savoury and cut unripe pineapple aromas.
wild fennel frond  [image]
wild rose  [image]

– September –
apple
asparagus frond  [image]
blackberry  [rhs]
blackcurrant leaf  [image]
blueberry   an aroma and taste profile synonymous with blackberry
beech nut   the trees produce every 5 years or so, when there are so many that the squirrels don’t get them all.
clematis  [image]  all colours and combinations, some have a vanilla or confected scent.
clover flower  [image]  white and purple clover have a delicately perfumed floral, even wild rose-like aroma, and sweet grass notes.
cut grass
dandelion flower   [image]  smells like fresh cut straw, with a stable-like edge.
elderberry  [rhs]  similar aroma (and taste), when completely ripe, to mulberry, with similar tart acidity. When not quite ripe there is an earthy/herbaceous edge.
fennel frond  [image]
fern leaf  [image]  crushed, appears in some South African sauvignon blanc.
fig  [image]
greengage
lemon balm leaf  [image]
lemon verbena leaf  [image]
mint leaf  [image]  two varieties shown.
mulberry  [rhssee July entry.
oregano  [image]
pea shoot  [image]  can be found in some sauvignon blanc.
pear
petunia  [image]  all colours and combinations.
plum
raspberry
red valerian  [image] [rhs if you ever smell gas or sewage around gardens, look around for this stinker, included here as an aroma attending some Chateauneuf-du-Pape.
rose  [image]  all colours.
scabious  (image)  wild and cultivated, with a sweet delicate scent.
stinging nettle  [image]  use gloves and chop up the young nettles.
strawberry
sweet pea flower
tomato leaf  [image]  can be found in sauvignon blanc and merlot.
viola  [image]  all colours.
walnuts  you will need the beat the squirrels to them.
walnut leaf  [image]  crush the leaves for savoury and cut unripe pineapple aromas.
wild fennel frond  [image]

– October –
apple
asparagus frond  [image]
beech nut  [image immature] [image mature from both red and green beech
blackberry  [rhs]
blackcurrant leaf  [image]
cut grass
dandelion flower   [image]  smells like fresh cut straw, with a stable-like edge.
hazelnuts   you will need to beat the squirrels to them.
lemon balm leaf  [image]
mint leaf  [image]  two varieties shown.
oregano  [image]
pear
petunia  [image]
quince  [image]  ripens on the south coast of England.
raspberry
rose  [image]  all colours.
stinging nettle  [image]  use gloves and chop up the young nettles.
strawberry
walnut leaf  [image]  crush the leaves for savoury and cut unripe pineapple aromas.

– November –
apple
cut grass
dandelion flower   [image]  smells like fresh cut straw, with a stable-like edge.
lemon balm leaf  [image]
mahonia
  [image] [rhs]  Mahonia x media Lionel Fortescue, with a scent reminiscent of lily of the valley.
mint leaf  [image]  two varieties shown.
pear
stinging nettle   [image]  use gloves and chop up the young nettles.

– December –
apple
mahonia  [image] [rhs]  Mahonia x media Lionel Fortescue, with a scent reminiscent of lily of the valley.

– In the home –
allspice  the dried berry of the Jamaican pepper, or pimento tree, the berries have a combined flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves, with a hint of juniper and peppercorn.
anise  [image]  the seed of the Mediterranean herb Pimpinella anisum.  See star anise, below.
bees wax candles
bread   all types, white, malt; brioche, croissant.
bread dough  if you make it by hand, with a 3 day ferment, like me.
butter
chocolate   with 70%+ cocoa content.
cinnamon
cloves
coffee  roasted beans and grounds.
digestive biscuit   pulverised in a bag, appears in some champagnes.
dried fruits   apricot, date, fig, mulberry (white, red and black), raisin, sultana.
garrigue   rub some herbes de Provence between you palms.
geranium   the aroma/flavour compound is geraniol, the emergence of this note in a muscat-based wine signifies a wine that is past its best.
ginger biscuit   appears in some champagne.
herbes de provence  this blend of herbs may contain basil, bay leaf, chervil, dill, fennel, lavender, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, thyme, sage, savory and tarragon.
honey
leaf tea   fresh and spent leaves.
lime   when tasting old riesling think of this rather than petrol.
lemon zest
nail varnish   for the acetone drier note in some Southern Rhone and  many Lebanese wines.
neroli oil   available from health food shops, with neroli on an almond oil base, this has a unique smooth powdery citrus aroma.  I find this on some sauvignon blanc and chardonnay.
nuts   natural or pan roasted, almond, hazelnut, walnut – pound some up in a freezer bag with a rolling-pin – then inhale deeply.
orchid  [image]  this is a cattleyas, a sympodial orchid, the first orchid I have experenced with a scent, quite delicate, like a cross between a flag iris and a viola.
pastry   needs to be warm.
pea shoots   grow all year round on the window sill, harvest when 8cms high.
pencil shavings   uncoated wood pencils are the most fragrant.
pepper   black and white.
SO2   just strike a match, and then ….. put it out.
star anise [image] the fruit of a sub-tropical tree.  See anise, above.
vanilla pod  [image] dried, a rich slightly tarry aroma.

Updated  24/08/17

About citbp

I am interested in everything about wine, from site selection to tasting.
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